By William Seidman I’ve had several checkpoint sessions with different companies using our program as part of getting started after the holidays. I found that there are a few people (fortunately not many) who aren’t doing the assigned learning exercises. It’s frustrating. They participate in the team meetings and discussions, but they aren’t well-prepared for the group discussions about the learning exercises – because they aren’t doing them. This mystifies me because their companies are investing a lot in them and there is clear evidence that their peers who are taking it seriously are out-performing them. Why would people not invest in themselves by doing the learning tasks when there are huge benefits to them and the organization? The primary answer seems to be that learning itself is a transformational process and heavy transactional pressure (the day-to-day stuff of work) drives out learning. So they choose not  to engage in work that can really help them improve.  Part of what we try to teach people is that they must be responsible for their own growth. The idea of owning your own growth is a new idea for a lot of people.  It’s the foundation for long-term success in any great organization.  ]]>

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