By William Seidman starIt may not sound like a difficult task, but it’s important to consciously and effectively identify the people at your workplace who are consistently and exceptionally good at their jobs, passionate about their work and always on the ball. These are what we call ‘Star Performers,’ though in the past they have been called rainmakers, bright spots, thoroughbreds or simply top performers. If you aren’t working to identify these people and put into action the methods of affirmative leadership, you aren’t making full use of their skills. What makes a Star Performer? It’s more than just being effective or skilled at their work – true stars are also passionate and motivated, willing to go above and beyond what is asked of them to get the job done. This is what makes them so good at what they do – a deep and abiding commitment to the work. In our book The Star Factor we talk about Miguel, who inspired a community with his vision for building affordable school houses in declining small towns. His passion and dedication to the task made him persuasive and effective, attracting people to his vision and his cause. Social scientists have a word for these types of people – positive deviants. They stand out from their social group or community and are identifiable by their unique approach to problem solving and to their work. Research suggests that they have an entirely different mental model that allows them to approach their jobs in an entirely different way, making them more passionate about it and better at it. And yes – it can be taught. Are you prepared to understand – and get the most out of  – The Star Factor?  ]]>

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