3dayworkweekWhen Carlos Slim, the Mexican telecom billionaire, suggested a global three-day workweek, news outlets around the world jumped on the story. More leisure time fits into the equation, but so does longer working days—and workers staying in the workforce into their 70s. According to Phillip Inman and Angela Monaghan, writing for The Guardian, “Unions might be wary, but technology, increases in life expectancy, and cost pressures from commuting and soaring house prices are all encouraging a more flexible approach to work.” Inman and Monaghan spoke with experts in the UK to get a sense of what the reality of a three-day workweek would mean. Here are some of their thoughts: David Kern, Chief economist, BCC: “Some workers would be happier and more productive, but for others, working 11 hours a day would not appeal.” Mike Emmott, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development: “Carlos Slim is right that people should carry on working into their 70s. It can be a positive development for many people, especially if they are interested in their work and want to maintain their work-related social life.” Sir Ian Cheshire, Chief executive, Kingfisher: “The idea of a three-day week is in principle interesting as part of a wider trend in the workplace to much more flexible patterns of working to suit lifestyles, older workers, multiple job holders and career re-entry.” Read the full article at theguardian.com.]]>

Share this...

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.